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Next stage of Hurricane Ida recovery involves street flooding, long lines for gas

By Jeremy Pittari

Picayune Item

Gas lines are long and some roads are closed Tuesday as the after effects of Hurricane Ida hit Picayune. Ida made landfall on the Gulf Coast on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Several roads were closed Tuesday morning, including North and South Loftin Avenue, North Beech Street near Westchester Road, Washington Avenue and Baylous Avenue.

Flooding of the roadway has also been reported along Inside Road, North Main Street, and along Adcox Road north of the intersection of Carroll Street.

By Tuesday at about noon, it appeared as though the creeks and rivers have crested, in the city, said Picayune Police Department Assistant Chief James Bolton.

With supplies and power in short supply in neighboring Slidell, La., gas lines grew in Picayune. Bolton said some people have been waiting an hour or two to get gas from the few gas stations that have reopened after the storm.

All officers with the department have been on the job, ensuring that traffic keeps flowing.

The following statement was issued by the city of Picayune, “ Citizens of Picayune, we asking everyone to be patient and understanding when dealing with our current situation. We have many people stopping to get supplies, food, and gas as they try to travel home down I-59. Stores are stocking food and other supplies as fast as possible. Gas trucks are trying to deliver gas as quickly as possible. Be mindful of how we all felt when we’ve evacuated and tried to return home.

We have been told that the Mayor of New Orleans has recommended to the citizens to leave due to limited resources available and no electricity. This means more people will be traveling and passing through Picayune. City of Slidell has also made reference to limited resources.

The electricity crews are working diligently to restore power. Almost everyone in Picayune has power restored.

If possible stay off the roads and enjoy your time at home with your loved ones. Many crews are out working, let them have space to work.”

Some damage was also reported at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Picayune. At some point during the storm, a portion of the brick wall on the back of the church fell on to the neighboring rectory, damaging the roof and rear rooms of the home. No injuries were reported as a result of that incidents, and repairs are already underway.

Outside of Picayune’s city limits, the county and Poplarville are dealing with similar situations concerning long lines at gas stations. Pearl River County Emergency Management Director Danny Manley said the increase of people looking for fuel has caused him to request additional help in the form of 10 troopers from the Mississippi Highway Patrol. Seven of those personnel will be sent to Picayune, while the other three will be sent to Poplarville.

Some roads in the county also flooded, but Manley said the creeks have crested and are in the process of retreating. Only one homeowner reported minor flooding, which occurred in the Westchester subdivision.

In terms of damage, Manley said his office has received about 37 reports of homes or other structures being damaged due to the storm. Most of the damage reported has been minor and typically involves roof damage.

All roads, however, are open now that they have been cleared of downed trees or other obstacles.

With the east and west branches of the Hobolochitto creek in decline, the Pearl River is expected to crest at 20.5 feet on Friday, which is below flood stage, Manley said. Gas lines are long and some roads are closed Tuesday as the after effects of Hurricane Ida hit Picayune. Ida made landfall on the Gulf Coast on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Several roads were closed Tuesday morning, including North and South Loftin Avenue, North Beech Street near Westchester Road, Washington Avenue and Baylous Avenue.

Flooding has also been reported along Inside Road, North Main Street, and along Adcox Road north of the intersection of Carroll Street.

By Tuesday at about noon, it appeared as though the creeks and rivers have crested, in the city, said Picayune Police Department Assistant Chief James Bolton.

With supplies and power in short supply in neighboring Slidell, La., gas lines grew in Picayune. Bolton said some people have been waiting an hour or two to get gas from the few gas stations that have reopened after the storm.

All officers with the department have been on the job, ensuring that traffic keeps flowing.

The following statement was issued by the city of Picayune, “ Citizens of Picayune, we asking everyone to be patient and understanding when dealing with our current situation. We have many people stopping to get supplies, food, and gas as they try to travel home down I-59. Stores are stocking food and other supplies as fast as possible. Gas trucks are trying to deliver gas as quickly as possible. Be mindful of how we all felt when we’ve evacuated and tried to return home.

We have been told that the Mayor of New Orleans has recommended to the citizens to leave due to limited resources available and no electricity. This means more people will be traveling and passing through Picayune. City of Slidell has also made reference to limited resources.

The electricity crews are working diligently to restore power. Almost everyone in Picayune has power restored.

If possible stay off the roads and enjoy your time at home with your loved ones. Many crews are out working, let them have space to work.”

Some damage was also reported at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Picayune. At some point during the storm, a portion of the brick wall on the back of the church fell on to the neighboring rectory, damaging the roof and rear rooms of the home. No injuries were reported as a result of that incidents, and repairs are already underway.

Outside of Picayune’s city limits, the county and Poplarville are dealing with similar situations concerning long lines at gas stations. Pearl River County Emergency Management Director Danny Manley said the increase of people looking for fuel has caused him to request additional help in the form of 10 troopers from the Mississippi Highway Patrol. Seven of those personnel will be sent to Picayune, while the other three will be sent to Poplarville.

Some roads in the county also flooded, but Manley said the creeks have crested and are in the process of retreating. Only one homeowner reported minor flooding, which occurred in the Westchester subdivision.

In terms of damage, Manley said his office has received about 37 reports of homes or other structures being damaged due to the storm. Most of the damage reported has been minor and typically involves roof damage.

All roads, however, are open now that they have been cleared of downed trees or other obstacles.

With the east and west branches of the Hobolochitto creek in decline, the Pearl River is expected to crest at 20.5 feet on Friday, which is below flood stage, Manley said.