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The desire for perfection: Altering one’s body

In today’s day and age, it’s difficult to pick up the latest fashion magazine and not view surgically altered women.

Women all over this country flock to their nearest plastic surgeon to alter numerous parts of their bodies.

There are even television shows about the phenomenon.

One example is Nip/Tuck, a fictional drama set in Miami, Fla., which is one of the plastic surgery capitals in the United States.

The show has outrageous plotlines, but the bottom line resonates with regular everyday woman. The majority of women are not happy with the body they were born with.

Then there is the reality television show Dr. 90210 about a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon.

The show also invites viewers into the operating room to view firsthand the many body-modification procedures.

Last Friday, a Mississippi jury convicted Jackson resident Tracy Lynn Garner of depraved-heart murder and conspiracy to commit wire fraud with regards to the 2012 death of 37-year-old Karima Gordon of Atlanta Ga.

According to an Associated Press article, Gordon received silicone-buttock injections from Garner and died eight days later.

In other news sources, it was reported that Garner was not a licensed physician.

Gordon’s death is a tragedy, however; it is an avoidable one.

There were many options available to this young woman, such as, visiting a licensed plastic surgeon, saving money to have a proper procedure or utilizing good old-fashioned buttocks enhancing exercise.

There are other ways of altering one’s body without the use of surgery.

For instance, getting rid of that spare tire around the middle can be controlled with diet and proper exercises.

There are many exercises also designed to enhance certain areas of the body.

Before visiting a plastic surgeon, try joining a gym, eating fruits and vegetables, hire a trainer or talk to a therapist about body image.

If one still feels the desire to surgically alter themselves, make sure it is done by a licensed physician