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America has become obsessed with celebrities

Fame is a goal some Americans aim to achieve. Others are content with watching stars from afar and either envying their status, or using it as a way to make themselves feel a bit better when they fall from grace.

Sometimes it seems that the obsession of keeping up with a famous person’s every move becomes tiring.

Does society really need to know that Robin Williams hung himself with a belt and was found with cuts to his wrist possibly by a pocketknife? Not really.

Would it change the world to know that Justin Bieber pleaded guilty to drag racing in a Lamborghini? Not in the least.

Did the world stop because Kim Kardashian made a public comment about why her brother didn’t attending their sibling’s wedding? Nope, the world still spins.

None of these things will affect the outcome of society in the long run. Sure they are great distractions from our own lives, and at times make our lives seem just a little better.

But in reality the things that really matter in life are the things that get the least amount of publicity.

Most people probably did not hear that a new species of dinosaur was discovered, or that the secret behind how geckos climb walls could be used to create robots with the same ability.

A satellite orbiting Saturn also recorded clouds moving over the surface of its moon Titan, but it’s likely no one heard about it.

Instead the entertainment and sports world, and all its perceived glory, dominate news feeds.

The thing is, no matter what people do for a living, they all face the same hardships. Relationships are sometimes tough to keep on track, especially in the spotlight of fame.

People get arrested for being, well, people, no matter what they do for a living.

So in the end, the things that seem so trivial really aren’t and the opposite is true for the things that receive the most press.