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Sorry for Your Loss

By Shannon Marshall

Luke told  in the 15th chapter of the gospel of Luke three parables of lost things. He wrote about the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the lost son. In each of these three parables something was lost, it is searched for and it is found. Once it was found it was no longer lost. There was much rejoicing each time the lost thing was found.

If you know where something is it isn’t lost. You don’t have to touch it or see it nor do you have to look for it because you know where it is. When Vance Havner’s wife passed away Warren Wiersbe wanting to comfort Vance said, “I’m sorry for your loss.” Vance said, “I haven’t lost her, I know where she is.

You don’t lose a loved one when you know where they are. Death may have taken them from your view but you don’t have to search for them because you know right where they are and who they are with. So, maybe we should say, “I’m sorry you feel at a loss but take great comfort in knowing they aren’t lost because you know where they are.” Paul wrote, “We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord.” (2 Corinthians 5: 8) Three things about lostness in this chapter in Luke.

First, lost things have value. The lost sheep was valuable to the shepherd. The lost coin was valuable to the woman. And the lost son was valuable to the Father.

Second, lost things require a search. You have to search for lost things if you want to find them. All things in the chapter of Luke were searched for.

Third, lost things are celebrated when found. The one searching for the lost sheep called together friends and neighbors to tell them the good news. The lady searching for the lost coin does the same thing. And the father searching for the lost son throws a party when the son was found. We don’t celebrate lostness, but we celebrate the finding of the lost. We can celebrate knowing we didn’t lose our loved ones, we know where they are.  Until He comes!