• 82°

Rebels Ready to Represent in Tokyo for Summer Olympic Games

Six Total Ole Miss Affiliated Athletes to Compete in Tokyo

 

Rebs in Tokyo | Rebels in the Olympics | Olympic Schedule | Broadcast Schedule

 

TOKYO – After a yearlong delay, five former Ole Miss standouts and one current volunteer coach are set to represent their home countries at the Games of the XXXII Olympiad – the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo that were rescheduled due to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Those six – Sam Kendricks (Team USA, track & field), Brittney Reese (Team USA, track & field), Raven Saunders (Team USA, track & field), Rafaelle Souza (Team Brazil, soccer), Ali Weisz (Team USA, shooting) and Ole Miss track & field volunteer coach Jessica Ramsey (Team USA, track & field) – are either already in Tokyo or en route over the next several days to an Olympics unlike any other. Strict COVID-19 measures are in place across Japan, and recently the decision was made to completely restrict fan attendance at all competitions following a declaration of a national state of emergency.

 

That said, this is still potentially a once-in-a-lifetime experience for first-timers like Weisz or Ramsey, and a chance for additional glory for returnees Kendricks, Reese, Saunders and Souza. Action is already underway for Souza, who started and played all 90 minutes in Brazil’s 5-0 victory over China in the beginning of women’s Group F action early Wednesday morning. Competition for the rest of the Rebel delegation picks up after the Opening Ceremonies, which will be held this Friday (July 23) at 6 a.m. CT live on NBC.

 

Fans can watch all the Olympic action live on the NBC family of networks or online at NBCOlympics.com. For more information regarding Rebel athletes in the Olympics, see below or visit OleMissSports.com/RebsInTokyo.

 

Ole Miss Olympians

Sam Kendricks – Team USA – Track & Field (Men’s Pole Vault)

Jessica Ramsey (volunteer coach) – Team USA – Track & Field (Women’s Shot Put)

Brittney Reese – Team USA – Track & Field (Women’s Long Jump)

Raven Saunders – Team USA – Track & Field (Women’s Shot Put)

Rafaelle Souza – Team Brazil – Women’s Soccer

Ali Weisz – Team USA – Shooting (Women’s 10m Air Rifle / Mixed Team 10m Air Rifle)

 

COMPETITION SCHEDULE (all times CT)

 

Wed., July 21

3:00 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – vs. China, Women’s Group F

 

Fri., July 23

6:00 a.m. CT – Opening Ceremonies

6:30 p.m. CT – Ali Weisz (Team USA) – Shooting – Women’s 10m Air Rifle Qualifying

8:45 p.m. CT – Ali Weisz (Team USA) – Shooting – Women’s 10m Air Rifle Final

 

Sat., July 24

6:00 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – vs. Netherlands, Women’s Group F

 

Mon., July 26

11:15 p.m. CT – Ali Weisz (Team USA) – Shooting – 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team Qualifying

 

Tues., July 27

1:15 a.m. CT – Ali Weisz (Team USA) – Shooting – 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team Bronze Medal Match (if qualified)

1:50 a.m. CT – Ali Weisz (Team USA) – Shooting – 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team Bronze Medal Match (if qualified)

6:30 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – vs. Zambia, Women’s Group F

 

Fri., July 30

3:00 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – Women’s Quarterfinals (if qualified)

5:25 a.m. CT – Jessica Ramsey (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Shot Put Qualifying

5:25 a.m. CT – Raven Saunders (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Shot Put Qualifying

7:40 p.m. CT – Sam Kendricks (Team USA) – Track & Field – Men’s Pole Vault Qualifying

 

Sat., July 31

7:50 p.m. CT – Brittney Reese (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Long Jump Qualifying

8:35 p.m. CT – Jessica Ramsey (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Shot Put Final (if qualified)

8:35 p.m. CT – Raven Saunders (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Shot Put Final (if qualified)

 

Mon., Aug. 2

3:00 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – Women’s Semifinals (if qualified)

8:50 p.m. CT – Brittney Reese (Team USA) – Track & Field – Women’s Long Jump Final (if qualified)

 

Tues., Aug. 3

5:20 a.m. CT – Sam Kendricks (Team USA) – Track & Field – Men’s Pole Vault Final (if qualified)

 

Thurs., Aug. 5

3:00 a.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – Women’s Bronze Medal Match (if qualified)

9:00 p.m. CT – Rafaelle Souza (Brazil) – Soccer – Women’s Gold Medal Match (if qualified)

 

Sun., Aug. 8

6:00 a.m. CT – Closing Ceremonies

 

—–

 

Rafaelle Souza • Team Brazil • Women’s Soccer

Years at Ole Miss: 2011-13
Hometown: Cipo, Brazil
Olympiads: 2 (2016, ’21)

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: 4th place (2016, Rafaelle Souza, Team Brazil)

 

Schedule
Wed., July 21 – 3:00 AM CT – Women’s Group F – China vs. Brazil
Sat., July 24 – 6:00 AM CT – Women’s Group F – Netherlands vs. Brazil
Tues., July 27 – 6:30 AM CT – Women’s Group F – Brazil vs. Zambia
Fri., July 30 – Starting at 3:00 AM CT – Women’s Quarterfinals (if qualified)
Mon., Aug. 2 – Starting at 3:00 AM CT – Women’s Semifinals (if qualified)
Thurs., Aug. 5 – 3:00 AM CT – Women’s Bronze Medal Match (if qualified)
Thurs., Aug. 5 – 9:00 PM CT – Women’s Gold Medal Match (if qualified)

 

Preview

A two-time All-SEC selection and 2013 All-American, Souza starred for three seasons for Ole Miss from 2011-13. Bagging 44 goals in her career, she ranks second on the Rebels’ all-time scoring list. Souza’s banner campaign came in 2013, tying for third in the NCAA with 22 goals on the year, the second most in a single season in program history. With the Brazilian leading the charge, Ole Miss racked up a program-record 16 wins, advancing to the NCAA Second Round.

 

Souza is making her second Olympic appearance with the Brazilian national team, helping the “Seleção” to a fourth-place finish in Rio in 2016. The year prior, she started every match for Brazil at the World Cup in Canada. Souza opened her scoring account with the senior team at the 2015 Pan American Games, tallying a brace in a 4-2 win over Mexico. At the club level, Souza was drafted 10th overall in the 2013 NWSL Draft by the Houston Dash, and has also seen stops with São Francisco EC in her native Brazil, Changchun Zhuoyue in China and most recently back in Brazil with Palmeiras this past season.

 

Career Notes
Olympedia Bio
• Selected 10th overall in 2013 by the Houston Dash in the Women’s Pro Soccer Draft
• 2013 NSCAA First-Team All-American
• 2013 CoSIDA Academic All-American
• 2x CoSIDA Academic All-District
• 2x NSCAA/USC Scholar All-America selection
• 2x SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year
• 2x All-SEC
• 2x NSCAA/USC All-Region
• Set what was then the Ole Miss records for career points (108) and goals (44)
• Scored 50 points alone in the 2013 season

2016, Rio • 4th Place
• On Brazilian team that finished fourth overall
• Played in all five matches

 

—–

 

Ali Weisz • Team USA • Shooting • Women’s 10m Air Rifle / Mixed Team 10m Air Rifle

Years at Ole Miss: 2013-17
Hometown: Belgrade, Mt.
Olympiads: 1 (2021)

World Rank: 6th

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: N/A (first in program history in Shooting)

 

Schedule
Fri., July 23 – 6:30 PM CT – Women’s 10m Air Rifle Qualifying
Fri., July 23 – 8:45 PM CT – Women’s 10m Air Rifle Final (if qualified)
Mon., July 26 – 11:15 PM CT – 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team Qualifying
Tues., July 27 – 1:15/1:50 AM CT – 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team Bronze/Gold Medal Matches (if qualified)

 

Preview

Weisz competed with the Rebels from 2013-2017 and collected two All-American honors during her career. She qualified for the NCAA Championship in each of her four seasons and placed third in air rifle in 2016. On Feb. 9, 2020, Weisz turned her dreams into reality, making her first Olympic team in air rifle, and after 12 months of waiting she is on the brink of competing on the biggest stage in the world in Tokyo.

 

Leading up to the games, Weisz competed in the 2021 ISSF World Cup in New Delhi. In the 10m air rifle event, she qualified for her first world cup final and went on to win silver. The 2017 Ole Miss grad also competed in both air rifle team events, winning silver with Mary Tucker and Sagen Maddalena in the women’s team final. Weisz teamed up with Kentucky shooter Will Shaner for a sixth-place finish in the mixed team contest. The pair of silver world cup medals were the first of Weisz’s career.

 

Career Notes
• Member of the USA Shooting National Team
• Serves as a Specialist in the U.S. Army Reserve
• 2021 World Cup New Delhi Silver Medalist (10m air rifle)
• 2021 World Cup New Delhi Silver Medalist (women’s team 10m air rifle)
• 2019 PanAmerican Games Team Member and Gold Medalist (women’s 10m air rifle)
• 2019 USAS 10m Air Rifle National Champion
• 2019 H&N Cup Bronze Medalist
• 2018 CAT Games Team Member and Silver Medalist (women’s 10m air rifle)
• 2018 World Championship Team Member
• 2017 USAS 10m Air Rifle National Champion
• Two time All-American (2016, 2017)
• 4x NCAA Qualifier
• 2016 NCAA Air Rifle Third Place Finisher
• First freshman in Ole Miss Rifle history to qualify for the NCAA Championships (2014)
—–

 

Jessica Ramsey • Team USA • Track & Field • Women’s Shot Put

Years at Ole Miss: 2015-Present (Volunteer Coach)

Alma Mater: Western Kentucky (2014)
Hometown: Boynton Beach, Fla.
Olympiads: 1 (2021)

World Rank: 2nd

U.S. Rank: 1st

Personal Best: 20.12m/66-00.25 | June 24, 2021 | U.S. Olympic Trials Record (No. 4 in U.S. history)

Season-Best: Same

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: 5th place (2016, Raven Saunders, Team USA)

 

Schedule
Fri., July 30 – 5:25 a.m. CT – Women’s Shot Put Qualifying
Sat., July 31 – 8:35 p.m. CT – Women’s Shot Put Final (if qualified)

 

Preview

Few expected Ole Miss volunteer coach Jessica Ramsey to be in contention to make Team USA in the shot put, let alone shatter the U.S. Olympic Trials record, but that is exactly what she did back on June 24 following a bombastic showing at the newly renovated Hayward Field. Ramsey has been on the scene since beginning her pro career with coaches Connie Price-Smith and John Smith back in 2015, making Team USA twice in 2018 (NACAC bronze medalist) and 2019 (Pan American bronze medalist), and in 2018 she showed she had the capacity to stun with what was then a four-foot PR of 19.23m/63-01.25 to fall within two inches of a national title as the U.S. runner-up.

 

However, that was just a precursor to her heroics last month. Ramsey – who entered ranked third but was picked eighth on the pre-meet formchart by Track & Field News – won a historic back-and-forth battle with former training partner Raven Saunders for the U.S. title. She opened with an eight-inch PR of 19.45m/63-09.75 in the first round, to which Saunders responded with an eight-inch PR of her own in the third round at 19.96m/65-06.00 that broke the U.S. Olympic Trials record. That mark stood for mere minutes, though, as Ramsey on her fourth attempt unleashed a mammoth two-foot improvement on top of her earlier eight-inch PR at 20.12m/66-00.25 – making her the fourth-best in the history of the United States.

 

Ramsey and Saunders now head to Tokyo on a mission to make history. The duo will pick up the mantle from reigning Olympic champion Michelle Carter, who won gold in Rio in 2016 – the first ever gold by an American and the first medal by an American since 1960. Ramsey lives and trains in Oxford and assists the Ole Miss track & field program as a volunteer coach with the throwers.

 

Career Notes
• 2021 U.S. Olympic Trials champion at USOT record toss of 20.12m/66-00.25, No. 4 in U.S. history
• 2019 Pan American Games bronze medalist
• 2019 U.S. indoor bronze medalist
• 2018 U.S. runner-up at what was then a four-foot PR of 19.23m/63-01.25), falling within two inches of the U.S. title
• 2018 NACAC bronze medalist
• Tripled at the NCAA Outdoor Championships as a senior for Western Kentucky in 2014, earning First-Team All-American honors in the shot put in eigth place
• Has been training with Ole Miss head coach Connie Price-Smith and throws coach John Smith since 2015

 

—–

 

Raven Saunders • Team USA • Track & Field • Women’s Shot Put

Years at Ole Miss: 2016-18
Hometown: Charleston, S.C.
Olympiads: 2 (2016, ’21)

World Rank: 3rd

U.S. Rank: 2nd

Personal Best: 19.96m/65-06.00 | June 24, 2021 | U.S. Olympic Trials (No. 5 in U.S. history)

Season-Best: Same

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: 5th place (2016, Raven Saunders, Team USA)

 

Schedule
Fri., July 30 – 5:25 a.m. CT – Women’s Shot Put Qualifying
Sat., July 31 – 8:35 p.m. CT – Women’s Shot Put Final (if qualified)

 

Preview

From her beginnings in Charleston, South Carolina, to high school superstar, to four-time NCAA Champion and Olympian, Raven Saunders has excelled at every turn, and now stands on the precipice of her second career Olympiad in Tokyo next week.

 

Saunders threw in just one meet in 2019 and had another small sample size in 2020 due to the pandemic, but through all of that, “The Hulk” was just waiting to return, and she did so indoors on Feb. 21 this year with a toss of 19.57m/64-02.50. At the U.S. Olympic Trials, Saunders unleashed a large eight-inch PR of 19.96m/65-06.00 in the third round, which was briefly the U.S. Olympic Trials record before former training partner Jessica Ramsey took the lead in the next round.

 

Saunders now returns to the biggest stage in sports, her second trip to the Olympics after a historic run as a 20-year old in Rio in 2016. Saunders made the final and finished fifth overall at what was then a personal best 19.35m/63-06.00, making her the youngest American to ever advance to the final. Saunders witnessed Michelle Carter make history as the first American to win gold and the first U.S. medal winner since 1960, and now heads to Tokyo alongside Ramsey in the hopes of making their mark as well.

 

Career Notes
Olympedia Bio
• 2x Olympian in the women’s shot put
• 2016 Olympic finalist in the shot put (5th place)
• 2017 U.S. Outdoor champion in the shot put
• 2021 U.S. Olympic Trials runner-up at career-best 19.96m/65-06.00, making her No. 5 in U.S. history
• Finished 10th at the 2017 World Outdoor Championships
• 4x NCAA Champion
• 7x All-American
• One of only four women in NCAA history to break 19 meters indoors and the first to do so outdoors
• First woman in NCAA history to break 19 meters twice in the same series
• Broke both collegiate records during her career
• 2017 USTFCCCA Women’s Indoor Co-National Field Athlete of the Year
• 2016 Bowerman Award Finalist
• 2015 Pan American junior champion
• 2014 World Junior silver medalist

2016, Rio • 5th Place
• Youngest American to ever make the women’s shot put final at 20 years old
• Threw what was then a personal best 19.35m (63-06.00) in the fifth round
• Michelle Carter won on a U.S. record 20.63m (67-08.25), becoming the first American to ever win gold and the first to medal since Earlene Brown won bronze in 1960

 

—–

 

Sam Kendricks • Team USA • Track & Field • Men’s Pole Vault

Years at Ole Miss: 2012-14
Hometown: Oxford, Miss.
Olympiads: 2 (2016, ’21)

World Rank: T-2nd

U.S. Rank: T-1st

Personal Best: 6.06m/19-10.50 | July 27, 2019 | U.S. Outdoor Championships (American Record, No. 3 World history)

Season-Best: 5.92m/19-05.00 | July 4, 2021 | Stockholm, Sweden

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: Bronze Medal (2016, Sam Kendricks, Team USA)

 

Schedule
Fri., July 30 – 7:40 p.m. CT – Men’s Pole Vault Qualifying
Tues., Aug. 3 – 5:20 a.m. CT – Men’s Pole Vault Final (if qualified)

 

Preview

The hometown hero Sam Kendricks looks to make Oxford proud yet again, heading to Tokyo in search of becoming the first American to repeat as a medalist in the men’s pole vault since Bob Seagren in 1968 (Mexico City, gold) and 1972 (Munich, silver).

 

Kendricks won bronze in Rio in 2016 amidst a historic Olympic pole vault final at 5.85m/19-02.25. The competition was wet and delayed nearly an hour due to rain, but the final few bars among Kendricks, former world record holder and silver medalist Renaud Lavillenie of France (5.98m/19-07.50), and home crowd favorite and gold medalist Thiago Braz of Brazil (6.03m/19-09.25) were sublime drama – with Braz coming out on top with an Olympic record. Furthermore, Kendricks – a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve – became a worldwide viral sensation after video surfaced of him stopping his warmup on the runway abruptly to stand at attention for The Star-Spangled Banner.

 

Since then, Kendricks has soared to ever greater heights, winning back-to-back World Championship gold medals in 2017 and 2019 – becoming the first repeat World champion since former world record holder Sergey Bubka. He extended his record streak of U.S. outdoor titles to six in 2019 on a historic American record clearance of 6.06m/19-10.50, and several months later he took down the U.S. Indoor record as well at 6.01m/19-08.50 before the pandemic brought global competition to a standstill.

 

Career Notes
Olympedia Bio
• 2x Olympian
• Olympic bronze medalist in 2016
• First Rebel men’s athlete in department history to make Team USA multiple times (regardless of sport)
• First men’s athlete in Ole Miss track & field history to qualify for multiple Olympiads
• Looking to become first American to repeat as a medalist since Bob Seagren in 1968 (Mexico City, gold) and 1972 (Munich, silver)
• American Indoor (6.01m/19-08.50) and Outdoor (6.06m/19-10.50) record holder in the pole vault
• 2x World Outdoor champion in the pole vault; one of only two men in history to repeat alongside former world record holder Sergey Bubka
• Won 2017 World title over world record holder, Mondo Duplantis
• 4x World Championships medalist (2x gold)
• 5x World Championships qualifier
• 9x U.S. Champion (6 outdoors, 3 indoors)
• First American to ever win six straight U.S. outdoor men’s pole vault titles (2014-19)
• 2x NCAA Champion (2013, ’14 outdoor)
• 2014 NCAA Indoor Runner-Up
• 5x All-American
• 2x SEC Champion
• 2013 World University Games Gold Medalist
• 2014 SEC Indoor Men’s Field Athlete of the Year
• 18x IAAF Diamond League champion
• 2017 USATF Jesse Owens Athlete of the Year
• 22nd member of the six-meter club

2016, Rio • Bronze Medal
Event Replay
• Took bronze in highly competitive pole vault final at 5.85m (19-02.25)
• Gold medalist Thiago Braz won on an Olympic record height of 6.03m (19-09.25) over former world record holder Renaud Lavillenie (5.98m/19-07.50)
• Competition was delayed by nearly an hour due to rain
• Kendricks, a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve, was caught on camera in a moment that soon went viral, stopping his warmup on the runway to stand at attention for The Star-Spangled Banner

 

—–

 

Brittney Reese • Team USA • Track & Field • Women’s Long Jump

Years at Ole Miss: 2007-08
Hometown: Gulfport, Miss.
Olympiads: 4 (2008, ’12, ’16, ’21)

World Rank: 3rd

U.S. Rank: 2nd

Personal Best: 7.31m/23-11.75 (+1.7) | July 2, 2016 | U.S. Olympic Trials (No. 3 U.S. history, No. 11 world history)

Season-Best: 7.13m/23-04.75 (+1.3) | June 26, 2021 | U.S. Olympic Trials

Best Finish in Ole Miss History: Gold Medal (2012, Brittney Reese, Team USA)

 

Schedule
Sat., July 31 – 7:50 p.m. CT – Women’s Long Jump Qualifying
Mon., Aug. 2 – 8:50 p.m. CT – Women’s Long Jump Final (if qualified)

 

Preview

Brittney Reese, one of the all-around greatest American athletes of all time, is looking to end her storied career with another finish atop the Olympic podium, and she seems to be in prime shape to do so. Reese, who is 34 years old and has been a global force in the long jump since bursting onto the scene at Ole Miss in 2007, heads to Tokyo fresh off her 13th career U.S. title – her ninth outdoors and her fourth at the U.S. Olympic Trials in as many tries in her career. Reese has announced that this will be her final Olympics.

 

Reese was in command of the competition at Trials from beginning to end, never relinquishing the lead once. Furthermore, she was heating up instead of wearing down as the competition wore on, clipping off three straight 7-meter jumps in the final three rounds – winning on her fifth round season-best of 7.13m/23-04.75 (+1.3), her best leap since 2017 and the No. 3 jump in the world this season.

 

This is the fourth career Olympiad for Reese, who finished fourth right out of college in Beijing in 2008 before taking gold in London in 2012 and narrowly taking silver in Rio in 2016. Reese is one of just 16 women’s athletes in U.S. history to make Team USA four times in track & field, as well as one of just four to do so in the long jump alongside Willye White (1956, ’60, ’64, ’68, ’72), Martha Rae Watson (1964, ’68, ’72, ’76) and Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1984, ’88, ’92, ’96). In 14 tries, Reese has made the global (Olympic or World Championships) long jump final 12 times and medaled 10 times – missing the final just twice in 2015 (World Outdoor, Beijing) and 2019 (World Outdoor, Doha).

 

Career Notes
Olympedia Bio
• 4x Olympian and 2x Olympic medalist
• One of just 16 women to make Team USA four times in track & field
• One of just four women in U.S. history to make Team USA four times in the long jump alongside Willye White (1956, ’60, ’64, ’68, ’72), Martha Rae Watson (1964, ’68, ’72, ’76) and Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1984, ’88, ’92, ’96)
• First Rebel woman to ever medal at the Olympic Games in track, first Rebel track athlete overall to ever win gold
• Has made the Olympic long jump final in all three of her trips, earning gold in 2012, silver in 2016 and finishing fourth in 2008
• 15x member of Team USA
• 11x World Championships qualifier (seven outdoors, four indoors)
• 8x World Championships medalist (seven golds)
• Olympics and World Championships combined, has only missed the global long jump final twice in 14 tries (2015 World Outdoor, Beijing; 2019 World Outdoor, Doha)
• 18x U.S. medalist
• 13x U.S. Champion
• 9x U.S. Outdoor champion in the long jump, third-most in U.S. history behind Stella Walsh (11) and Willye White (10)
• Track & Field News’ No. 1 U.S. Women’s Athlete of the 2010s (No. 4 worldwide)
• Career-best leap of 7.31m/23-11.75 (+1.7) from the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials ranks 3rd in U.S. history, 11th in world history
• 2x NCAA Champion at Ole Miss
• 5x All-American
• 5x SEC Champion
• 4x SEC runner-up
• 3x SEC Women’s Field Athlete of the Year
• 2x SEC Commissioner’s Trophy winner
• First Rebel to win national athlete of the year, taking USTFCCCA Women’s Field Athlete of the Year in 2008
• Still ranks fourth indoors (6.87m/22-06.50) and outdoors (6.93m/22-09) in NCAA history
• Outdoor mark was the best in NCAA in 31 years at the time

2008, Beijing • 4th Place
• Led all competitors in the qualifying round at 6.87m (22-06.50)
• Originally finished fifth at 6.76m (22-02.25)
• Was moved up to 4th in 2017 following a positive drug test disqualified Russian silver medalist Tatyana Lebedeva

2012, London • Gold Medal
Highlights & Interview
• Entered as the favorite after winning the last four World Championship titles across the indoor and outdoor seasons
• Won gold on her second attempt of 7.12m (23-04.50)
• One of only three Americans to ever win gold in the long jump (Jackie Joyner-Kersee, 1988; Tianna Bartoletta, 2016)
• First American to win gold in the long jump since Jackie Joyner-Kersee in 1988

2016, Rio • Silver Medal
Highlights
• Took the lead in her fifth attempt of 7.09m (23-03.25), but was overtaken by her teammate Tianna Bartoletta with her winning leap of 7.17m (23-06.25)
• Reese improved to 7.15m (23-05.50) to solidify her silver medal slot and give the United States a 1-2 punch atop the podium