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Local hospital does not see increase in heat stroke cases despite high temperatures

Despite the National Weather Service issuing a heat advisory for the area Wednesday, Pearl River County Hospital and Nursing Home has seen a typical number of patients suffering from heat stroke, said director of nursing Lisa Brown.

Over the last two weeks, the hospital saw two athletes who suffered heatstroke during their workouts, and two older men who suffered heat stroke while doing yard work, Brown said.

Hospital staff typically see a couple of heat stroke cases per week in the summer months, Brown said.

Hydration is key to preventing heat stroke, Brown said, as well as saving outside activities for the cooler times of the day.

“Go out early in the morning and in the evening when the sun is not high noon, that’s the best thing to do,” Brown said.

Heat stroke happens when the body is unable to cool itself down fast enough, according to the Mississippi State Department of Health website. When the body temperature rises faster than the body can cool down, damage to vital organs can occur, according to the CDC Extreme Heat Guide.

High humidity levels increase the risk of heat related illness, according to the CDC Extreme Heat Guide.

Heat stroke warning signs include nausea, dizziness, a throbbing headache and an extremely high body temperature. Anyone experiencing those warning signs should call for medical help and be rapidly cooled, according to the Mississippi State Department of Health website.

Heat exhaustion is a milder medical condition that can result from high temperatures and inadequate hydration, according to the Mississippi State Department of Health website.

Warning signs of heat exhaustion include heavy sweating, muscle cramps, dizziness, nausea, weakness and fainting, according to the Mississippi State Department of Health website. The site recommends getting immediate medical help for severe symptoms or symptoms in someone with high blood pressure or heart problems.