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Keep it clean on social media

If I could use one word to describe Facebook, it would be dramatic.
Every day, there seems to be a new saga unfolding on my social media feed.
To be clear, I’m not talking about all of my friends, just the habitual offenders who feel the need to share every moment of their lives, which includes ugly relationship breakups and family problems.
I believe that the majority of them do this in order to feed their selfish need for attention and to make their lives appear more fulfilling than they really are.
There’s the deadbeat dad scenario. In reality, he does not spend time with his children, but during the five minutes that he does, he makes sure to snap a “selfie” and post it on Facebook.
On the other hand, there’s the mother who abandons her children but is quick to post loving motherly quotes online as if she plays a role in their lives.
The last scenario I will mention is the passing of a loved one. After the loved one has passed, I agree that the loving remembrances posted from friends and family really help with the healing process. When I see a friend has lost someone close to them, I always send my condolences.
However, an up-to-date play-by-play of a loved one’s slow death, I feel, is inappropriate.
Yes, it’s sad, and yes, you would like people to pray for your family, but this has the potential to create panic and confusion.
As a loved one lies dying, it should be a private event, not one that is broadcast over social media.
I feel the people contributing to this madness do so in order to feed a need for attention. They should allow their loved ones to die with dignity, not on a “stage.”
A majority of people are private individuals and do not like their business aired on Facebook.
My point is, keep it clean, friendly and honest. I enjoy having a Facebook account and reading about people’s triumphs, seeing their children’s latest pictures and keeping in touch with people I don’t see very often.