• 81°

A New Year in Pearl River County

Each year, millions of Americans vow to change something about themselves or their communities for the better.
The new year represents a fresh start, an opportunity to complete those often hard to complete goals.
The tradition of the New Year’s resolutions began thousands of years ago.
According to the Ancient Origins website, the Babylonians were the first to make resolutions more than 4,000 years ago. The ancient people made promises to their gods at the beginning of the year, which for the Babylonians began in mid-March when crops were planted.
The Babylonians believed that if they kept their promises, the gods would bestow their grace upon them, the website states.
Ancient Christians spent the first day of the new year reflecting on past mistakes and resolving to improve oneself, the website states. Christians attended “watchnight” services to prepare for the new year and make resolutions.
Today, people still resolve to generate positive differences in their lives.
According to USA.gov, some of the more popular modern day New Year’s resolutions include losing weight, volunteering, quitting smoking, getting a better education or job, saving money, exercising, eating healthy, getting out of debt, taking a trip, recycling and drinking less alcohol.
Here in Pearl River County, there are many people ranging from city officials, business owners and community members that make resolutions each year.
Eric Morris is the director of Public Works for the City of Picayune and in 2015 he aspires to do his best to think outside the box regarding city projects.
“I resolve to do everything in the power of this department, and I as head, make the most of the cast iron gas project and reduce the unaccounted for in our natural gas system,” Morris said. “I also vow to make our water system as efficient as can be through ongoing efforts to repair leaks and upgrade the system within the confines of the city’s available budget.”
Poplarville Board of Alderman member, Maggie Smith said she would like to see the board continue to work together harmoniously in order to attract more businesses and industries to the city of Poplarville.
“We have a number of projects that I would really like to see completed for the New Year,” Smith said. “I would like to accomplish a corridor that would connect the Pearl River Community College to the city, complete with bike path, sidewalk, lighting and signage along Smith Boulevard.”
The city will continue to update the park’s facilities, Smith said.
Smith, who is also a member of the Poplarville Chamber of Commerce’s board, said she would like to see the Chamber continue to grow and offer opportunities through lunch and learn to help Poplarville’s businesses succeed.
“I would like to see more family oriented activities that our citizens will feel that not only is Poplarville a good place to live, but also to raise a family and worship,” Smith said.