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“Hunting for a cure”: Community rallies for Blaine

mother and son: From left Blaine and his mother Kim embrace in Huffman’s Paint Your Own studio.  Photo by Cassandra Favre

mother and son: From left Blaine and his mother Kim embrace in Huffman’s Paint Your Own studio.
Photo by Cassandra Favre


Childhood. For the majority of people, it’s a happy and carefree adventure. There are always new things to learn, first time visits to special events and places and new people to meet.
Some of the biggest dilemmas children face are who their best friend of the week will be, what to eat for lunch and how much the tooth fairy will leave under their pillow.
But for whatever reason, there are some children that experience life-altering events even adults have difficulty managing.
Blaine Breaux, 10, is a student at Pearl River Central Upper Elementary and was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in October.
Kim Breaux, Blaine’s mother, is a first grade teacher’s assistant at the lower elementary and said her son is an avid outdoorsman.
“He loves hunting, camping and being outside,” Kim said. “He is usually very energetic and enjoys playing with his friends especially his cousin Victoria Trosclair.”
During the first days of October, Kim noticed her son was fatigued, had pale skin coloring and wasn’t acting like himself.
On Oct. 4, Kim took Blaine to Oschner hospital in Slidell and within an hour doctors informed the family they were testing for three viruses and said the diagnosis could be as bad as leukemia.
Blaine’s red and white blood cell count was five. For someone his age that count should have been 10 or 12, Kim said.
Blaine was admitted to the hospital and underwent a bone marrow biopsy the following Monday.
On Tues. Oct. 7, Blaine was diagnosed with A.L.L. leukemia and began chemotherapy the next day.
Kim said Blaine’s type of cancer hides in the spine, which requires spinal taps or lumbar punctures along with treatments.
Blaine will undergo two rounds of treatment. The first round involved treatments being administered once a week. The second round will entail 10-weeks span and days of treatment that will alternate according to the week.
“The doctor’s goal is for Blaine to be in remissions after the 29th day,” Kim said. “Even if he is declared cancer free, there could be cells hiding. That’s why they are going to be more aggressive with the second round of chemotherapy.”
Kim said she always prepares herself for the worst and something told her that Blaine’s diagnosis would be leukemia.
Her father passed away from colon cancer at the age of 44 and watching Blaine undergo chemotherapy reminds her of when she witnessed her father’s fight.
“The thought of visiting a funeral home crossed my mind and stays in the back of my mind,” Kim said. “I take it one day at a time and remember that God doesn’t give me more than I can handle.”
Blaine’s godmother Melissa Trosclair, describes her godson as a loving and caring boy.
“He’s been very mature about his diagnosis and treatment,” Trosclair said. “He’s not the same kid, I can’t believe how well he handled it all. He has a heart of gold and would do anything for anybody.”
As a result of Blaine’s diagnosis, medical and travel expenses have accrued and family, community and teachers are hosting fundraisers to defer these costs.
There is a Blaine Breaux account set up at all Hancock and Whitney Bank locations where donations are welcome.
Blaine’s GoFundMe account can be found at www.gofundme.com/fncky0.
On Dec. 6th, Batting for Blaine, a cabbage ball and softball tournament, will be held at Friendship Park.
“Hunting for a Cure” bracelets are available for $3. Email Melissa Trosclair at trosclair2002@outloook.com to purchase. Also available from Melissa are $5 raffle tickets for a chance to win a $1,000 Carnival Cruise Line gift card.
This Saturday and Sunday, Paint Your Own Studio owner Chris Huffman will host “Painting with a Purpose: Blaine Breaux Stronger than Cancer” at her art studio in Picayune.
Huffman hosts a kid’s camp and has known Blaine since he was in kindergarten. She also hosts pottery activities at local schools.
“I get attached to a lot of these kids,” Huffman said. “They get inspired when they create art. It gives them a sense of self-pride. When you feel something like this hit close to home, you want to do something.”
Participants will paint a canvas entitled ‘‘I love you to the Moon and Back.’’
The event will be held on Saturday Nov. 22 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday Nov. 23 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Huffman’s studio located at 168 Richardson Rd.
Children canvases cost $25 and adults are $35.
The reservation deadline is Thursday Nov. 20 at 6 p.m. A $10 non-refundable deposit is required and children younger than 13 must be accompanied by an adult. For non-painting adults, there will be a $5 donation fee.
For more information contact Huffman at 601-329-9211.
Follow Blaine’s story on Facebook at Blaine Breaux.