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Don’t forget to vote today

Today is the general election to decide who will occupy various offices and the outcome of one resolution. The polls will open at 7 a.m. and remain open until 7 p.m.
For the United States Senate three candidates are running, including Travis Childers (D), incumbent Thad Cochran (R) and Shawn O’Hara (Ref.).
Running for the office of U.S. House of Representatives 4th Congressional District are Matt Moore (D), incumbent Steven McCarty Palazzo (R), Cindy Burleson (Ind.), Eli Jackson (Ref.), Ed Reich (Ind.) and Joey Robinson (Lib.).
Running unopposed for the nonpartisan seat of Chancery Court District 10 Judge Place 1 is incumbent Deborah J. Gambrell.
For the nonpartisan seat of Chancery Court District 10 Judge Place 2 incumbent Dawn Beam is running unopposed.
To fill the nonpartisan seat of Chancery Court District 10 Judge Place 3 incumbent Johnny Lee Williams is running unopposed.
Incumbent M. Ronald Doleac is running unopposed to fill the nonpartisan seat of Chancery Court District 10 Judge Place 4.
In the race for the nonpartisan seat of Circuit Court District 15 Judge Place 1 James L. “Jim” Gray faces incumbent Anthony A. Mozingo.
Incumbent Prentiss G. Harrell is running unopposed for the nonpartisan seat of Circuit Court District 15 Judge Place 2.
Incumbent Richelle Lumpkin is running unopposed for the nonpartisan seat of County Court Judge.
In the special election to fill the seat of District II Supervisor nine candidates are running, including James Ernie Clark, Bradley Holston, Everett Earl Lawrence, H.R. “Ray” Mitchell Jr., Matt Mitchell, Malcolm Perry, Daryl Smith, Joseph “Josey” Russell Tynes and Frank Vaccarella.
Also on today’s ballot is House Concurrent Resolution 30, which aims to establish hunting, fishing and wildlife harvesting as a constitutional right. If approved, all of the same regulations and restrictions will apply that promote conservation and management of wildlife as prescribed by legislative law. Voters who select “yes” agree hunting and fishing should be a right, while voters who select “no” do not agree those activities should be a right.