• 72°

Trick or treat safely

The United States Census Bureau says that an average of 41 million trick-or-treaters venture out every year across the country, and roughly 106 million homes are solicited for candy and other treats on this holiday. Such a high number of people out on the street can increase the risk of injury, and there is potential for children to be lost.
It is thought that Halloween celebrations date back to roughly 800 to 600 BC, when they originally were observances of the harvest season before the arrival of winter. However, our traditions have varied significantly over the years.
On this night full of lore, it is important to take a few precautions to ensure everyone’s safety and enjoyment.
Here are a some tips to take into consideration:
• Do not enter homes. Let kids know not to enter homes, unless they are of known friends, and even then they should only do so after getting permission from a parent.
• Adults should drive carefully. All drivers should slow down and anticipate children darting out into the roadways on Halloween. Drive slowly and pay attention to the roads.
• Don’t take dogs trick-or-treating. Although you may have a calm, well-mannered dog, the crowds in the neighborhood may excite man’s best friend, whose behavior might be difficult to predict. Also, other animals that get loose from homes when the doors are opened may provoke your dog. It’s enough to keep your eyes on your children, never mind being mindful of your dog, too.
• Halloween wouldn’t be nearly as sweet without troves of candy treasures. Children are urged to have their candy sorted and inspected by parents prior to eating to avoid any dangers, such as food allergies or tampering.
• Consume only factory-wrapped treats. Well-meaning people may hand out cupcakes or marshmallow cereal treats, but it is best to stick with store-bought items instead since the ingredients and safety of home-made treats cannot be confirmed.