• 66°

Things that I miss: Part three

As  the  years  go  by  and  I  look  back  on  all  the  things  we  had  and  enjoyed  decades  ago,  I  have  come  to  realize  just  how  much  I  miss  them.

I  have  assembled  a  partial  list  and  hope  that  many  of  you  will  recall  these  same  items  and  some  of  you  “youngsters”  will  learn  a  little  something.

Back  to  the  movies  for  a  moment,  I  miss  being  able  to  hear  only  the  sounds  coming  from  the  theater  speakers.  People  who  want  to  visit  with  each  other  or  make  and  receive  phone  calls  should  go  elsewhere  instead  of  to  a  movie.  A  good  thing  about  drive  in  movies  was  that  you  could  control  the  noise  level  in  your  car  and  turn  the  speaker  as  loud  as  you  wanted.  That  is  if  you  were  actually  interested  in  watching  the  movie.  

I  miss  the  majority  of  products  and  merchandise  in  stores  being  made  in  the  USA.  When  one  of  the  big  national  chains  remodeled  a  while  back,  I  wrote  a  letter  to  their  home  office  and  told  the  CEO  that  while  they  were  moving  things  around,  they  should  put  the  imports  on  one  side  of  the  store  and  the  USA  products  on  the  other  side  and  see  which  side  got  most  of  the  action.

I  miss  being  able  to  communicate  with  people  and  not  have  to  try  and  figure  out  all  the  cutesy  abbreviations  and  terms.  Youngsters  and  older  persons  who  use  those  cutesy  abbreviations  will  be  in  for  a  big  surprise  when  they  get  out  into  the  real  world  and  when  they  go  on  job  interviews.  They  will  not  have  an  adequate  vocabulary  to  properly  express  themselves.

I  miss  being  able  to  operate  a  TV  or  kitchen  appliances  or  a  car  radio/CD player/stereo  without  first  taking  an  electronics  course.  To  watch  a  DVD  in  my  home,  I  have  to  use  three  remote  control  devices.  

One  that  came  with  the  TV  and  the  one  for  satellite  and  the  one  that  came  with  the  DVD  player.

And  finally,  I  miss  the  days  that  we  could  change  the  batteries  in  a  flashlight  without  all  the  government  warnings  telling  us  to  wear  safety  goggles  and  acid  proof  gloves.  (This  may  be  a  slight  exaggeration  but  you  get  the  point.)  

There  are  a  lot  of  “so  called  safety  warnings”  that  make  no  sense  whatsoever.  

That  additional  info  on  packages  or  instructions  inside  the  package  are  just  one  more  thing  that  increases  the  cost  of  the  item.

By Jim Towler