• 68°

Some of the things that I miss: Part two

As  the  years  go  by  and  I  look  back  on  all  the  things  we  had  and  enjoyed  decades  ago,  I  have  come  to  realize  just  how  much  I  miss  them.  I  have  assembled  a  partial  list  and  hope  that  many  of  you  will  recall  these  same  items  and  some  of  you  “youngsters”  will  learn  a  little  something.

I  miss  a  good  mystery  or  “whodunit”  movie  and  TV  show  where  you  do  not  know  the  identity  of  the  guilty  person  until   the  last  few  minutes.  You  were  able  to  work  along  with  the  investigators  and  try  to  determine  the  guilty  party.  Alfred  Hitchcock  was  the  master  at  writing  and  directing  such  shows.

Speaking  of  movies,  I  miss  writers  for  movies  and  TV  shows  who  had  a  good  vocabulary  and  did  not  have  to  use  so  many  cuss  words  and  vulgar  terms  so  the  actors  would  have  something  to  say.  For  some  reason,  today’s  writers  seem  to  think  all  that  trash  talk  is  entertaining.    

The  mention  of  entertaining  reminds  me  that  I  miss  the  really  funny  and  entertaining  greats  in  show  business  in  years  gone  by.  People  who  did  not  need  all  the  cuss  words  and  vulgar  terms  to  make  an  effort  at  being  funny.  People  such  as  Red  Skelton,  Bob  Hope,  Lucille  Ball,  Jackie  Gleason,  Carol  Burnett,  Tim  Conway  and  Harvey  Korman.  I  know  that  some  of  these  can  be  seen  in  reruns  on  some  of  the  cable  channels.  The  generation  of  today  and  future  generations  need  quality  entertainment  like  we  enjoyed  in  the  past.

Two  contemporaries  of  some  of  those  mentioned  above  were  Fred  Astaire  and  Ginger  Rogers.  Everyone  talked  about  what  a  great  dancer  Fred  was.  Do  you  realize  that  in  all  those  movies,  Ginger  made  the  same  dance  steps  as  Fred  and  she  was  moving  backwards  at  the  time  and  often  wearing  high  heels?

I  miss  variety  shows  such  as  The  Ed  Sullivan  Show.  The  acts  included  singers,  tap  dancers,  jugglers,  acrobats,  comedians  and  magicians.  There  were  also  ventriloquists  such  as  Senor  Winces.  It  was  a  very  entertaining  hour  and  the  people  in  the  audience  were  well  dressed.  These  days  the  only  reasonably  well  dressed  audience  I  see  is  on  the  funny  videos  show.

I  miss  Burma  Shave  signs.  For  all  of  you  who  are  too  young  to  know,  in  the  days  before  Interstate  Highways  and  four  lane  roads,  many  of  the  two  lane  roads  were  mostly  lined  with  farms  where  crops  were  raised  or  cattle  and  dairy  herds.  The  fields  and  pastures  were  fenced  and  little  advertising  signs  were  attached  to  the  fence  posts.  Burma  Shave  was  a  company  that  sold  shaving  lather  and  their  signs  were  a  series  of  four  to  six  signs  with  three  to  five  words  on  each  little  sign.  The  last  sign  in  each  group  said,  “Burma  Shave”.  Here  are  three  examples:  “No matter  the  price”,  “No  matter  how  new”,  “The  best  safety  device”,  “In  the  car  is  you”.  Burma  Shave.   “Car  in  ditch”,  “Driver  in  tree”,  “The  moon  was  full”,  “And  so  was  he”.  Burma  Shave.  “Passing  school  zone”,  “Take  it  slow”,  “Let  our  little”,  “Shavers  grow”.  Burma  Shave.  

The  persons  riding  shotgun  (front  passenger  seat)  or  someone  in  the  back  seat  would  read  the  signs  aloud  while  the  drivers  kept  their  eyes  on  the  road.

By: Jim Towler