Tips for summer swimming

Published 7:00 am Saturday, May 31, 2014

FUN IN THE SUN: The Cornerstone Pool Manage Jesse Pfadenhauer discusses pool safety tips and prepares the pool for swimmers.  Photo by Alexandra Hedrick

FUN IN THE SUN: The Cornerstone Pool Manage Jesse Pfadenhauer discusses pool safety tips and prepares the pool for swimmers.
Photo by Alexandra Hedrick

Summer is time for fun on the water, whether it’s had at the beach, lake, or pool. But to guarantee everything is fun, there are some safety measures swimmers should take.

According to the Center for Disease Control, almost 4,000 people die from drowning each year in the United States.

Learning to swim properly reduces the risk of drowning by 88 percent, which is why the CDC suggests enrolling children in swim classes.

While a child may know how to swim, it doesn’t mean parents should be less attentive while their child is in the water, said The Cornerstone Pool Manager Jesse Pfadenhauer.

“It’s a good time for the kids, but it can be very dangerous,” Pfandenhauer said.

He said children shouldn’t run near a pool because of the slick conditions that can cause children to fall and seriously hurt themselves.

Parents should constantly watch their children and even count to make sure no children are missing if there is a large group, Pfandenhauer said.

“Parents should keep a good eye on their kids and make sure they know their kid’s swimming ability,” Pfandenhauer said when determining what a child needs to help them swim and stay safe.

The CDC recommends parents and guardians learn CPR because it can be essential for the child while a lifeguard or paramedic responds for medical assistance.

With Pearl River County’s proximity to Gulf Coast beaches, vacationers should heed the warnings from the colored flags on the beach and the Environmental Protection Agency.

There are more than just rip currents to be cautious of at the beach.

While the water may look clean, visitors should heed EPA warnings. The EPA tests the water for diseasing-causing microorganisms that can cause serious illnesses, according to the CDC.

Water quality is something swimmers should be aware of while swimming in pools.

According to the Mississippi Department of Health, chlorine in swimming pools doesn’t kill all germs immediately. Depending on the microorganism, it can take minutes or days for the chlorine to kill it.

The Mississippi Department of Health suggests avoiding getting water in the mouth and swallowing water from a pool, lake or beach.

Showering before swimming and properly washing hands before swimming, especially after using the restroom or changing a diaper, helps prevent pool contamination, according to the Mississippi Department of Health.

For parents with young children, the Department of Health recommends taking children on frequent bathroom breaks and checking their diapers every 30 – 60 minutes.

Also, wash children thoroughly with soap and water before swimming.