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Education on the man with a dream

This photo was taken on Aug. 28, 1963 in Washington D.C., at the Lincoln Memorial during the "March on Washington." Courtesy of UPI Photos

This photo was taken on Aug. 28, 1963 in Washington D.C., at the Lincoln Memorial during the “March on Washington.”
Courtesy of UPI Photos

 

I remember learning about Martin Luther King while attending Dwight D. Eisenhower Elementary School, in Gretna, La.

My teacher, Mrs. Polette, was the most amazing woman who encouraged my inner artist and taught me that it was acceptable to acknowledge people’s differences but not look down on them for it. Those same people had eyes of their own and had the opportunity to judge me.

My mother had me sit outside the classroom while the teacher taught the class about Martin Luther King. He was not from where we were from. She had not had the privilege of having a teacher like Mrs. Polette. I did sit outside in the hall, while the class learned about King, but do to my mother’s reaction, I was more intrigued than ever. I proceeded to grill my poor teacher with point- blank questions during recess each day. That is how I learned about Martin Luther King.

The “I have a dream” speech was delivered to the crowd at the famous “March on Washington,” in 1963. As a first grade student, I would have no doubt had challenges with the meanings of some of the words he so eloquently delivered.

Below are some of the words I would likely have had challenges with. Check them out and as always, you can find the answers at the end of the column.

 

 

Words

 

1. Civil rights

2. Discrimination

3. Minister

4. Racial

5. Segregation

6. Dream

7. Speech

8. Peace

9. Leadership

10. Struggle

11. Protest

12. Nonviolence

13. Justice

14. Boycott

 

 

Definitions

 

A. Freedoms that every nationality can take advantage of; the right to personal space.

B. To advance slowly against a strong idea or force.

C. The lack of physical or rough force.

D. A punishment or reward for actions brought forth and executed.

E. A demonstration of disapproval for a person, action, or idea.

F. Visions or thoughts of positive action in the future.

G. Things related to a persons heritage and skin color.

H. Characterizing against a person because of external factors such as group, class, race, or religion.

I. To abstain from an object, place, or idea because of resentment.

J. Communicating a thought or idea in front of an audience.

K. To separate any object or person from the main group because of differences.

L. To guide or give direction to a group.

M. A person who leads religious worships and ceremonies.

N. A punishment or reward for actions brought forth and executed.

 

 

Answers:

 

1.F; 2.C; 3.M; 4.K; 5.A; 6.H; 7.E; 8.L; 9.B; 10. G; 11.J; 12.D; 13.N and 14.I